Holy Land Olive Wood – Hand made by Christians we stock an enormous range of Olive Wood products from Bethlehem

Hand made by Christians we stock an enormous range of Olive Wood products from Bethlehem

Holy Land Olive Wood

Hand made by Christians we stock an enormous range of Olive Wood products from Bethlehem – the place where Jesus was born make the perfect Christian gift from the Holy Land – Something for everyone and shipped to you direct from Jerusalem

Christian and Messianic Gifts from the Centre of Jerusalem

Thank you for visiting us here at the Jerusalem Gift Shop!

Our shop, located in Jerusalem, the heart of the Holy Land, has a huge inventory of unique gifts that we have provided for you, our valued customers. We’re happy to be your connection to Israel!
We were established in 2004 with a desire to build a bridge between the nations and Israel through our gift shop and News from Jerusalem service.  We have expanded greatly since then, both in terms of the range of gifts that we provide as well in the huge number of customers that comprise our loyal support base.  We appreciate you so much and are constantly on the lookout for new items to add to our inventory for you. To our new customers, we look forward to extending the same heartfelt service and appreciation to you as well! We hope that you will be as blessed to receive our carefully selected products as we are blessed to be able to serve you. We’ve recently added blogs about life in Israel to our website to make your connection to this land even closer. Shalom, shalom!

“I will bless those who bless you…”
Genesis 12:3

 
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All Eyes on Jerusalem as Muslim “Day of Rage” Engulfs City

Jerusalem Dome Photo All Eyes on Jerusalem as Muslim - Day of Rage Engulfs City

Imans in east Jerusalem neighborhoods and in Judea, Samaria, and Hebron closed mosques to encourage tens of thousands to come storm the Temple Mount.

In response, Prime Minister Netanyahu convened the Security Cabinet Thursday evening to prepare for the situation.

 (Israel) Israel Police deployed some 3,000 officers in and around Jerusalem Friday morning and announced that the Temple Mount would be open for traditional Muslim prayers. (Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

“Heightened security will take place in and around the Old City. Police and border police units [have been] mobilized in all areas and neighborhoods and will respond to any incidents or disturbances throughout the day,” Israel Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said in a statement.

“The Temple Mount is open for women of all ages and men over the age of 50,” he continued. “Police are coordinating to enable Friday prayers to take place and at the same time secure measures taking place.”

Meanwhile Palestinian factions in the West Bank (Judea and Samaria) and Gaza Strip called Thursday for Muslims to storm the site to protect the al-Aksa Mosque.

Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh used social media to get the message out, YNet reported.

“Tomorrow is an important turning point in the defense of the al-Aqsa Mosque and we will leave the victors,” Haniyeh said. “The Israeli plans for al-Aqsa will not be carried out. This is a red line. You are stoking the fire. We are calling for a day of rage and general mobilization of the Palestinian society and the entire Arab nation in the framework of the campaign to defend Jerusalem and al-Aqsa.”

The call didn’t stop with Haniyeh. Hamas spokesman Fawzi Barhoum announced that Israelis were attacking the al-Aksa and preventing Muslims from praying there.

At the same time, imans (clerics) in east Jerusalem neighborhoods and in Judea, Samaria, and Hebron closed mosques to encourage tens of thousands to come storm the Temple Mount.

Netanyahu convened the Security Cabinet Thursday evening to prepare for the situation.

Metal Detectors Won’t Be Removed

Following the lengthy meeting, the cabinet decided to buck international pressure and not to remove the metal detectors installed outside the Lion’s Gate entrance to the Temple Mount. Ministers also affirmed their confidence in the police, authorizing them to take whatever steps necessary to maintain public order and security both on city streets and at the site. (Screengrab via CBN News)

Just like visitors to the Western Wall – and the Vatican for that matter – anyone wishing to enter the Temple Mount will be required to pass through the scanners. (Non-Muslim visitors to the Temple Mount, who must enter through a separate gate, have been subjected to rigorous security checks and metal detectors for years.)

Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat weighed in on the decision, calling it “courageous.”

“The decision of Jerusalem District Police Commander Yoram Halevy to place metal detectors on the Temple Mount is a courageous decision because at this time last week two policemen were murdered at the site. This decision is a responsible one that will help to ensure that such incidents do not repeat themselves,” the mayor said. “This is not a political matter; it is a professional security issue. No one is challenging the status quo on the Temple Mount.”

While police dealt with sporadic rioting during the week – as well as attempted terror attacks in several locations, hundreds of Muslims entered the site to pray, passing uneventfully through the newly installed metal detectors.  

The terror attack, which took place exactly one week ago at 7:00 a.m. Friday, prompted the upgraded security measures. Two Israeli officers were shot dead in that attack and a third injured.

Netanyahu closed the site temporarily for purposes of investigation, reopening it Sunday morning. The weapons used in the attack had been brought into the mosque the night before, reportedly aided by officials with the Wakf, the Islamic Trust responsible for the day-to-day administration of the site.

Following the closure, the Wakf cried foul, claiming Israel was endangering the al-Aksa mosque, a ploy that’s been used repeatedly to incite violence.

In response to a White House press release posted midweek, Netanyahu issued a statement he’s repeated many times over the years.

“Israel is committed to maintaining the status quo on the Temple Mount and the freedom of access to the holy sites. Israel is committed to protecting the safety of all worshipers and visitors to the Temple Mount,” the statement read.

The midweek White House press release referred to the site by its Jewish and Muslim names.

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Christian Breakin News Jerusalem Leader: “Why Jews Everywhere Should be Helping Egypt’s Christians”

Leader: "Why Jews Everywhere Should be Helping Egypt's Christians"

“I implore you to join us in this effort. Do something—anything—to raise awareness about and to alleviate the suffering of Coptic Christians, and Christians across the Middle East. As Jews, it is our sacred duty. As human beings, it is our natural obligation. As past victims of such hatred, it is our people’s commitment. As current beneficiaries of Christian support, it is an act of humble gratitude. It is time for Jewish communities around the world to give back to the Christian community, which has given us so much.” – Yael Eckstein

 During Israel’s Operation Protective Edge in Gaza in 2014, I had dinner with a Christian pastor and his family in North Carolina. I was stunned and impressed that each time a rocket was launched from Gaza into Israel, the family’s “Code Red” app blared on their cellphones and they stopped whatever they were doing to pray for Israelis in danger. (Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

And they didn’t just pray. Their sincere concern for the wellbeing of Israel manifested itself in action. They donated tens of thousands of dollars to build bomb shelters all across Israel to help protect us. “It is our honor to use our money to provide protection to Israelis from terrorist rocket fire. Buying a new car, renovating my kitchen or doing anything else for myself wouldn’t give me nearly as much joy and fulfillment,” the pastor told me. 

I left his house feeling awed and inspired. “I hope that my people would help Christians in their time of need, as they have done for us,” I thought.

Truth be told, on the whole, we as a people have done an excellent job in raising awareness among our children and our communities about the importance of tikkun olam (repairing the world), of reaching out and supporting worthy causes beyond those that directly affect Jews. At almost every rally and peaceful protest, you can see an Israeli flag, the Star of David or another identifier of Jewish presence. We are helping Syrian refugees, standing up for women’s rights and volunteering in the world’s poorest countries, just to name a few causes we champion. Helping others who suffer from persecution, injustice or discrimination is a hallmark of the Jewish community, and I am proud of that.

But at the same time, there are cries that have gone unheard, such as those of the Christians being systematically persecuted—and slaughtered—across the Middle East. Coptic Christians, an indigenous population of Egypt dating back to the 1st century A.D., hundreds of years before Muslims even came on the scene, have been especially targeted. They represent almost 10 percent of Egypt’s population and are being persecuted by Islamic terrorists. 

At least 28 Coptic Christians, including many children, were ambushed and murdered May 26 as they traveled by bus to a monastery. Two terror attacks hit crowded Coptic churches April 10, killing at least 44 people. Since January 2017, more than 100 Copts have been targeted, murdered and systematically threatened.

In response to this horrific campaign of terror, I am astounded that the Jewish community has remained virtually silent.  

The Jewish community and Israel currently enjoy unprecedented, historic support from the Christian community. Christians are our loudest defenders in the political arena, our most vocal supporters on social media and our greatest contributors when it comes to charitable causes. The annual budget of the International Fellowship of Christians and Jews (The Fellowship) is $150 million, which is distributed to 1.4 million Jews in need in Israel and around the world. These funds are sacrificially donated by hundreds of thousands of Christian donors in the U.S. and worldwide. Moreover, Christians make up more than half of the tourists who come to Israel annually, significantly bolstering the Jewish state’s economy and morale.

If we can stand up for the sake of other peoples who suffer and for different just causes, how can we not act on behalf of our greatest allies? With all of the issues we are taking on, how is this not at the forefront of our agenda?

For the last few years, Egypt’s Coptic Christians have been the target of a calculated, cruel terror campaign. Men, women and children (and sometimes intentionally women and children) have been murdered in cold blood. Their places of worship and holy books have been blown up and burned. Their homes and shops have been attacked and looted. Sound familiar? We know all too well this pattern in history and we have vowed never to let it happen again. (Photo Credit: Yael Eckstein)

The Fellowship has not stood silent in the face of such horror. We have heard the cries of the Christians in Egypt and we are helping them. The Fellowship is providing assistance such as summer camps for children and financial aid to families who are victims of terror; aid for basic needs, including food as well as medical and psychological care; and security support. (We cannot publicize additional details for security reasons.)

In a time when the Christian community has been Israel’s staunchest supporter for the past half century, it is shocking that we are the only Jewish organization taking tangible steps to give them aid, support and protection.

I implore you to join us in this effort. Do something—anything—to raise awareness about and to alleviate the suffering of Coptic Christians, and Christians across the Middle East. As Jews, it is our sacred duty. As human beings, it is our natural obligation. As past victims of such hatred, it is our people’s commitment. As current beneficiaries of Christian support, it is an act of humble gratitude. It is time for Jewish communities around the world to give back to the Christian community, which has given us so much.  

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The Language of Prayer, Proclamation and Praise

The blessing of diversity

The longer I lead this far-flung ministry of Jews for Jesus, the more I have grown to appreciate the many languages the Lord has given His creation. I know, the initial division of language was God’s judgment on the pride and sinfulness of humanity as seen in the incident at the tower of Babel as recorded in Genesis 11. But our God is a God of redemption, and so Jesus, the incarnate Word, transforms the curse of division into the blessing of diversity. Ever since the day of Pentecost, God has been bringing people together through the gift of the gospel proclaimed aloud in many languages spoken upon the earth.

And so my heart was warmed as I sat with our Jews for Jesus European board of directors and selected staff in a classroom of Middlesex University just minutes from our Jews for Jesus “Shoppe” in North London. Our London staff daily proclaims the gospel to Jews and everyone who will listen in the King’s (or is it the Queen’s?) English. However, many who travelled to London for that meeting spoke English as a second, third or perhaps even fourth language. Yet we were united by the gospel, a love for Jesus and an earnest desire to see His salvation declared throughout Europe and around the world.

Prayer unites us

After each country’s report, we gathered around the missionaries from that country to pray. As is our tradition, each person prayed in his or her heart language. Prayers were offered in English, French, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Russian and yes, in Hebrew. And while most of us were unable to understand every prayer, the passion for God and for the salvation of the Jewish people was clear beyond words. All of us could say a heartfelt “Amen” (that’s Hebrew) at the end of each prayer, confident of the perfect bonds of unity we shared in Yeshua (Jesus).

Proclamation compels us

If prayer unites us despite diverse languages, then proclamation compels us. Jesus commanded us to make disciples of all nations, and I find it awe-inspiring that each and every day people around the world hear the good news of Jesus in their own language! You see, people need to hear the gospel in their own language. It is the best chance they have to respond to His grace.

Would you believe, people can hear the gospel in their language . . . by learning a new language? Just prior to our European board meeting I was in Israel, where some of our Russian-speaking staff have formed a club to help other Russian speakers learn Hebrew. One man, Slavic, was highly surprised to find that Jews for Jesus had organized the club. He had heard about us before moving to Israel, and when he came to reside there permanently, a group called “Christians for Israel” helped him. He took the fact that he was learning Hebrew from Jews for Jesus as divine providence, and wanted to know more about our faith. Praise God! Please pray for Slavic.

Praise lifts us

If prayer unites us and proclamation compels us, then it is praise that lifts us up together. I know that some people are fearful about how globalization might affect us. But when I look at the big picture, I say that we who love the Lord and believe in His coming Kingdom should not fear. Globalization in its best and truest sense is promised in Scripture:

Then I saw another angel flying in the midst of heaven, having the everlasting gospel to preach to those who dwell on the earth—to every nation, tribe, tongue, and people—saying with a loud voice, “Fear God and give glory to Him, for the hour of His judgment has come; and worship Him who made heaven and earth, the sea and springs of water.” (Revelation 14:6–7)

As we praise Him, we can envision God’s great plan for all of humanity, and our spirits are lifted up beyond the temporary darkness. Praise gives us a foretaste of the day we’ll all join our hearts together at His throne of grace, enveloped in His love for all people in Jesus Christ. We have a bright vision of a wondrous future in God.

It’s a vision that should unite us in prayer, compel us to proclaim and fill us with praises for God and the great hope we have in Jesus, now and always.

“O for a thousand tongues to sing my great Redeemer’s praise; the glories of my God and King, the triumphs of His grace!”

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